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Posts for: February, 2013

By Upper Montclair Dental Associates
February 26, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
OralHealthTipsforSpecialNeedsChildren

If you are the parent or caregiver of a special needs child or a child with a chronic disease, you face additional challenges when it comes to life's everyday routines. This includes establishing and maintaining good oral health so that your child is not at risk for other healthcare issues due to poor oral hygiene. For these reasons, our office has put together real-world advice that will make a difference in the life of your child.

The visit to our office that can make the biggest difference is your child's first one. However, be sure to contact us in advance of your child's appointment to let us know the details of your child's special needs or chronic disease state. This will give us the opportunity to contact your child's primary care physician or one of his/her specialists before starting treatment to obtain any medical information or special instructions. It will also enable us to be prepared so that we can pay special attention to these needs, as well as to make any necessary modifications to our office and/or equipment. Our primary focus is to work with you and your child's healthcare team towards the same goal. We all want your office visit to go smoothly and comfortably so that your child's first dental experience is a positive one.

Depending on the age of your child and his/her special needs, we most likely will start a gentle process of training and education. For example we will teach your child how to brush properly. It is important that you sit in and participate in this educational process so that you can reinforce this training at home. And little things count; before working with your child at home, you should set the stage so that it will be a comfortable setting with adequate light, fresh water for rinsing, and a mirror. You also need to have all of your supplies handy, such as a toothbrush, toothpaste, floss and rubber gloves (if needed).

To learn more tips, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How To Care for the Oral Health of Children with Disabilities and Special Needs.” Or, you can contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about your child's special oral healthcare needs.


By Upper Montclair Dental Associates
February 15, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: snoring   sleep apnea   sleep  
5ReasonsWeCanHelpYourSnoringandOtherSleepRelatedBreathingDisordersSRBDs

Snoring and other sleeping disorders impact between 50 and 70 million Americans each year. However, did you know that our office can help when it comes to diagnosing and treating sleeping disorders? For this reason, we have put together this list to highlight how we can have a positive impact on your snoring.

  1. Many people are surprised to learn that physician training is lacking and very slowly evolving in the area of sleep related breathing disorders. Therefore, there is limited public and medical awareness. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) has acknowledged that properly trained dentists are the first line of therapy for treating mild to moderate sleep apnea effectively.
  2. Because we see our patients on a more regular basis than many primary-care physicians, we dentists are in a unique position to identify and/or detect a SRBD. However, for us to accomplish this, you must share the facts about your sleeping habits and issues related to breathing. In other words, do not be embarrassed to let us know that your spouse, sleeping partner or family complain to you about your snoring!
  3. When it comes to treating complications associated with Oral Appliance Therapy (OAT) used in managing Sleep Related Breathing Disorders (SRBD), dentists are the primary professionals who are specifically trained to create, fit, adjust, monitor and treat any complications associated with a mouthpiece (oral appliance).
  4. Did you know that dentists help identify the approximately 90% of misdiagnosed cases of patients suffering from a SRBD? Well, it is true. We play a critical role in diagnosing and treating these patients.
  5. Another reason why it is much easier for us to diagnose and treat these problems is because the core of our training is centered upon the oral cavity, mouth and parts of the upper airway — the very areas where your snoring and SRBDs occur.

If you suffer from snoring or any other Sleep Related Breathing Disorder, it is imperative that you seek and obtain treatment. Ignoring these problems can lead to issues such as: an irregular heartbeat, heart attacks, high blood pressure, and other forms of heart disease as well as strokes and impotence. Contact us today to discuss your questions about snoring or to schedule an appointment. You can also learn more about snoring and sleep disorders when you continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sleep Disorders & Dentistry.”


By Upper Montclair Dental Associates
February 10, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
PlanningYourWeddingDaySmileMakeover

In a recent online poll conducted by Dear Doctor, the premier oral healthcare resource for consumers, 77% of those polled planned on visiting their dentist prior to their wedding. For some, this includes a thorough cleaning to remove stains and freshen both their smile and breath. However, a growing number of brides, grooms, and parents of the couple are seeking cosmetic dentistry or more specifically, a smile makeover, to transform their smile for their special day as well as their future.

If this describes your situation, take the first step towards the smile you have always wanted. To create your ideal smile, we will first meet with you to get to know you better and hear your concerns, goals, expectations and wedding day timeline. Bringing in photos or magazine images of smiles that you consider beautiful will help to ensure that we understand what you find attractive, as beauty can vary greatly from individual to individual. During this initial consultation, you will also learn about your smile makeover treatment options and what you could expect immediately prior, during and following each option.

Some subtle improvements we may consider are teeth whitening and bonding. Both of these options can take place in just a few office visits and produce very attractive results. Porcelain veneers and crowns can provide you with longer-term results that can last from 10 to 20 years. However, because they typically require 1 to 4 months advance notice, it is important to see us as soon as possible to ensure you have enough time before your special day. Another procedure that can play a dramatic role in your smile makeover is periodontal plastic surgery to improve and alter your gum tissues and their relationship to your teeth. For example, the appearance of “short” teeth can be corrected by lengthening them during a surgical procedure that has minor discomfort yet results in a life-long change.

Want to learn more?

Contact us today to discuss your smile makeover questions or to schedule an appointment. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor article, “Planning Your Wedding Day Smile.”


By Upper Montclair Dental Associates
February 03, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dental implants   tooth loss  
NotJustFillingintheGapsLostTeethHaveUnexpectedConsequences

Why is it important to replace missing teeth with restorations such as dental implants? You might be surprised to find that the damage caused by missing teeth is much greater than the simple gaps left in your smile.

As the years go by, teeth lost early in adulthood cause structural changes in a person's face. By age 45 changes in facial structure are already visible in the form of sunken cheeks. By 60, cheeks and lips lose their support, resulting in an aging look. This process continues and if the teeth are not replaced, much of the structural support of the person's face is lost.

These changes are caused by loss of bone. Although it may seem static, bone is actually living tissue that needs constant stimulation to maintain its form and density. With normal stimulation it is in a constant state of resorption (breaking down) and deposition (building up). Teeth provide the needed stimulation for the bone that surrounds them (called alveolar bone) as they meet each other during biting, chewing, and speech. When the stimulation continues, the bone continues to rebuild itself. Without this stimulation, the bone resorbs, does not build up again, and loses substance.

Without stimulation, alveolar bone loses width, height, and volume. Since your teeth and their surrounding bone support your chin, cheeks, and lips, this has a powerful effect on your appearance. It may also affect your ability to chew and to speak.

As alveolar bone diminishes, the next layer of bone also begins to resorb. This is the bone of the jaw itself. The lower part of the face begins to collapse, and the cheeks become hollow. This effect is especially noticeable for people with no teeth (edentulous).

Usually the first tooth to be lost, due to infection and decay, is a molar (back tooth). In the past, a missing single back tooth was frequently replaced by a fixed partial denture (FPD). A crown is provided for each of the two teeth on the sides of the gap, called abutment teeth, to support a false tooth in the middle. However, if they are not well cared for, the abutment teeth may be the next to succumb to decay.

Today the treatment of choice is an implant. A dental implant is a tooth-root replacement made of titanium, which fuses with the bone — making it very stable. Above the gums it is covered by a crown that looks like a natural tooth. The benefit of the implant is that it continues to provide stimulation to the alveolar bone, preventing bone loss.

Implants are also a good choice in the case of multiple missing teeth. They can be used to support bridges or false teeth (dentures). The results are an improved, younger appearance and better functionality.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about missing teeth. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth.”