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Posts for tag: retainer

By Upper Montclair Dental Associates
July 26, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: retainer  
ABondedRetainer-AnotherOptionforKeepingYourNewStraightSmile

For some, the excitement over their braces coming off gets dampened a bit with the prospect of now having to wear a retainer. But it has to be—newly realigned teeth have a tendency to revert to their previous positions out of a kind of “muscle memory.” A retainer prevents that from happening.

But as essential as it is, the standard retainer is almost as noticeable as braces, a major reason why many patients are less than enthusiastic about wearing them. And, because it's common for them to become lost when out of the mouth, replacing one becomes an added expense.

But there's another option—the bonded retainer. This retainer consists of a metal wire bonded to the back of the teeth to prevent them from moving. Because it's fixed in place, only a dentist can remove it.

The bonded retainer addresses the previous two issues associated with a removable retainer. Because it's behind the teeth rather than in front, it's out of sight to others. And, because it's fixed in place, there's no danger of losing it.

But unlike its removable cousin, which can be taken out for oral hygiene, the bonded retainer can make flossing more difficult. And, by nature, a bonded retainer must be worn all the time; a removable retainer allows for a more flexible schedule later in the treatment of a few hours a day.

So, which retainer option is best for you or another family member? A bonded retainer may be more attractive for appearance's sake, if it must be worn indefinitely, or if there's a high probability of the teeth moving out of alignment. And, it might be the right choice where there's a concern about a patient's ability to keep up with a removable retainer.

If you do decide to go with a bonded retainer, ask your dental hygienist for training on using floss with the fixed appliance—this can help improve oral hygiene. Whatever you choose, bonded or removable, your retainer will help you keep that new, beautiful, straightened smile.

If you would like more information on orthodontic retainers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bonded Retainers.”

By Upper Montclair Dental Associates
November 06, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: orthodontics   retainer  
TheTop5ReasonsWhyYouShouldWearYourOrthodonticRetainer

OK, so you've been getting orthodontic treatment for what seems like a long time, and finally, your braces are about to come off! Now you're home free, right?

Well, almost… but now comes the final part of your treatment: the retention phase. That means you'll need to wear a retainer. Most people find that a retainer is more comfortable than braces — but because it is often removable, there's the temptation to just leave it off. Don't do it! Here are the top five reasons why you should always wear your retainer as instructed:

1) A retainer helps to make your teeth stable in their new positions.

Your teeth aren't rigidly set in stone (or in bone) — instead, they are held in place by a hammock-like set of ligaments, and the bone that surrounds them is somewhat pliable. That's a good thing… because, otherwise, they would be even harder to move! But it means that it will take some time for the bone and ligament around the teeth to re-form and stabilize in its new position. A retainer holds them in position while that is happening.

2) If you don't wear it, your brand-new smile may not stay looking the way it should.

Did you know that your bone and gum tissue have some “memory?” Unfortunately, it's not the kind that could help you on a science quiz — but teeth can “remember” where they used to be located… and, if you leave them alone, they may try and go back there! A major goal of the retainer is to keep your new smile looking great! If you don't wear it, and your teeth shift back, you risk losing all the time (and money) you invested.

3) There are different types of retainers available; one of them might be just right for you.

At one time, all retainers were made of pink plastic and silvery wire, and were removable. That kind is still available, but now you may have a choice of different colors or patterns — you might even be able to customize yours! Another alternative that may be appropriate is a clear retainer that fits over your teeth, making it nearly invisible. In some cases, you can have a thin wire bonded to the inside of the teeth instead of a removable retainer. It doesn't show, and you don't have to worry about taking it out.

4) As time goes on, you'll probably need to wear your retainer less and less.

At first, you'll probably need to wear your retainer all the time, but after a while you may only have to wear it at night — a lot easier to manage! Think of it as a way of easing yourself out of orthodontic treatment — and into a brand-new smile. The retention stage also helps your teeth avoid damage by allowing the process to end slowly and gently.

5) Lots of celebrities wear them.

If we know who, we aren't telling — but let's just say that several young entertainers and a recently married British Prince have worn retainers, or are still wearing them. So, you're in good company!

If you would like more information about orthodontic retainers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Why Orthodontic Retainers?” and “The Importance of Orthodontic Retainers.”

By Upper Montclair Dental Associates
August 22, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: braces   orthodontics   retainer  
WearinganOrthodonticRetainerPreservesYourWell-EarnedSmile

Orthodontic treatment (commonly known as braces) can be a lengthy process to re-align your teeth to a more functional and aesthetic position. Once the orthodontic devices are removed, however, the treatment isn't finished. Wearing a retainer is the final step to ensuring that the re-alignment doesn't eventually fail. It's designed to do just what its name implies — to “retain” the teeth's new position and prevent a relapse to the old.

This can happen because of the way teeth fit into the jaw bone. The teeth are joined to the bone by the periodontal ligament, which works somewhat like a hammock: the ligament's fibers act like threads that fit into the tooth on one side and into the bone on the other, and hold the teeth in place.

As living tissue, the ligament's cell structure is dynamic and can adapt to the gentle pressure applied by an orthodontic device. However, once this pressure subsides after the device is removed “muscle memory” can cause the ligament to resist the new position and pull the teeth back to their original setting. The retainer helps hold the teeth in the new position while the bone and ligament continue to mature and stabilize around the teeth.

There are two basic types of retainers; the one recommended for you will depend on your age and the extent of your orthodontic treatment. One type is a removable device that is typically worn around the clock initially, but may eventually only need to be worn at night or for even a lesser interval of time. The other type is attached permanently behind the teeth and can only be removed by an orthodontist. Permanent retainers have the benefit of not being as visible as the removable type, and there's no bother with putting them in and taking them out.

You may consider wearing a retainer a nuisance especially after months of orthodontic treatment. But consider it the last lap in a long race — only by finishing can you achieve that winning smile.

If you would like more information on the use of a retainer, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Importance of Orthodontic Retainers” and “Why Orthodontic Retainers?