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Posts for tag: mouthguards

By Upper Montclair Dental Associates
July 23, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   mouthguards  
AreYouanAthleteHereAreFiveReasonsYouShouldWearaMouthguard

Are you ready to suit up for sports? Mouthguards have been called the most important part of an athlete's uniform. Designed to absorb and distribute the forces of impact received while you participate in athletic activities, your mouthguard is a protective appliance that covers and cushions your teeth and gums to prevent and reduce injury to your teeth, jaws, lips and gums. A properly fitted protective mouthguard is comfortable, resilient, tear resistant, odorless, tasteless, not bulky, fits well, and has sufficient thickness where needed. If you wear it when engaging in contact sports it can prevent injury, pain, suffering and years of expensive dental treatment.

Here's why athletes need mouthguards:

  1. Sports related dental injuries account for more than 600,000 emergency room visits each year. Mouthguards are recommended particularly for contact sports such as boxing, football, hockey and lacrosse.
  2. An athlete is 60 times more likely to suffer harm to the teeth when not wearing a mouthguard. It is estimated that mouthguards prevent more than 200,000 injuries each year.
  3. Properly fitted mouthguards protect the soft tissues of the lips, cheeks, gums and tongue by covering the sharp surfaces of the teeth that can cause lacerations on impact. They also reduce the potential for tooth injury, jaw damage or jaw joint fracture and displacement by cushioning against impact — absorbing and distributing the forces that can cause injury.
  4. Custom-fitted mouthguards are made from exact and precise models of your teeth. They are effective, comfortable, easy to clean, and do not restrict breathing. The best mouthguard is custom designed to fit your mouth and made in our office after your athletic needs have been assessed. For a growing child or adolescent, a custom made mouthguard can provide space for growing teeth and jaws.
  5. A mouthguard properly fitted in our office costs little in comparison to the cost of treatment after injury. If your teeth are knocked out and are not properly preserved or replanted you may face lifetime dental costs of as much as $10,000 to $20,000 per tooth.

The American Dental Association recommends the use of custom mouthguards in 27 sports/exercise activities. Make an appointment to consult with us to find out more about mouthguards. You can also read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Athletic Mouthguards: One of the most important parts of any uniform!

By Upper Montclair Dental Associates
September 26, 2012
Category: Oral Health
IsThereScientificEvidencethatMouthguardsReallyWork

One question we are most often asked by parents of athletes or those who participate in physical sports is, “Do mouthguards really work?” And when we respond, “yes,” a common follow-up question is, “Is there any scientific evidence to support this claim?” Based on this scenario, we feel it is important to provide you with some interesting and evidence-based facts on this topic.

The first reported use of mouthguards was in the sport of boxing. And because participants and bystanders in the 1920s quickly witnessed their effectiveness even back then, the trend's popularity grew to the point that boxing became the first professional sport to require them. However, other sports soon started following this lead — especially those high-contact sports. The American Dental Association (ADA) started mandating the use of mouthguards for football in 1962 and the US National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) currently requires mouthguards for football, ice hockey, lacrosse and field hockey. The ADA has since expanded their recommendations to now include 29 different sports and exercise activities. So now that you know more about the professional organizations pushing the use of mouthguards, let's get back to the second question, “What's the evidence?”

There have been numerous studies over the years regarding the properties of mouthguards, and more specifically their shock absorbing capabilities. Other studies have been based upon their protective abilities due to their stiffness, hardness and strength. This research has enabled us to vastly improve upon the effectiveness of mouthguards. For example, years ago latex rubber was a popular material used to create mouthguards. However, today we use products such as ethylene vinyl acetate or polyurethane because they are far superior in durability and flexibility. And impact studies have shown that the chances of fracturing teeth is dramatically reduced when wearing one of these mouthguards...especially when compared to individuals wearing no mouthguard at all. In fact, research has revealed that by not wearing a mouthguard during physical sports or exercise, individuals are 60 times more likely to experience an injury to the mouth and/or teeth.

To learn more about the importance of protective mouthguards, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Athletic Mouthguards.” Or you can contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about mouthguards.